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Typical Florentine foods

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Typical Florentine foods you should try during your stay in Florence

Antipasti Florentine
A typical Florentine antipasto is crostini di fegato, which consists of croutons covered in a liver spread (veal, chicken, goose, duck…) mixed with chopped anchovies, onions and capers for flavor.

Bistecca alla Fiorentina
The steak is cut from the loin and has the classic T-shape of the T-bone steak. A good steak should be between 3 and 4 fingers high and may weigh between 800g and 1.2kg. It is cooked on the grill and served well-roasted on the outside and red on the inside.

Ribollita
A famous Tuscan hearty soup made with bread and vegetables. Its name literally means reboiled. There are many different variations to prepare it but the main ingredients always include bread, beans (often cannellini), black kale, cabbage and vegetables such as tomato, carrot, chard, potatoes, celery and onion.

Panzanella
A Tuscan salad mainly made of stale bread soaked in water and tomatoes. Other ingredients can also be onions and basil, dressed with olive oil and vinegar. The salad is very popular in the summer period also in other parts of central Italy.

Lampredotto
A typical Florentine dish, made from the fourth and final stomach of a cow. Lampredotto can be found as street food, served on a bread roll with vegetables, herbs and a spicy or green sauce. Another way of preparation is called Bollito misto which is a classic stew.

Schiacciata alla Fiorentina
A traditional Florentine cake which can be found in local pasticceria (pastry shops) all over the city. The cake was originally served at Easter but nowadays can be enjoyed all year round. It is similar to a sponge cake with orange zest and the option of adding a wide variety of fillings such as ricotta and cream.

Cantuccini
Typical Italian almond biscuits (cookies) that originated in the city of Prato. They are twice-baked and oblong-shaped. The biscuits are dry and crunchy. Traditionally eaten either dipping them in a glass of Vin Santo (one of the region’s dessert wines) or with an Italian coffee (Espresso).